Workforce Resources 2016-11-27T09:08:23+00:00

WORKFORCE INNOVATION RESOURCES

Don’t Miss National Apprenticeship Week: November 13-19, 2017

November 9th, 2017|Comments Off on Don’t Miss National Apprenticeship Week: November 13-19, 2017

Mark your calendars! Next week— November 13 – 19, 2017—is the third annual National Apprenticeship Week (NAW).

NAW is a nationwide opportunity for the workforce system and leaders in business, labor, education, and other critical partners to express their support for apprenticeship by showcasing their programs, facilities, and apprentices in their community. All week and across the country, there will be a series of industry-led […]

As Corporate World Moves Toward Curated Microlearning, Higher Ed Must Adapt

November 7th, 2017|Comments Off on As Corporate World Moves Toward Curated Microlearning, Higher Ed Must Adapt

Just outside the walls of the ivory tower, a transformation is underway in the world of corporate learning, and those of us at colleges and universities should pay attention.

Corporate learning and development, often referred to as L&D, is radically different than just a few years ago. Meanwhile, the education dialogue has shifted to a focus on employment-related themes such as competencies and skills.

“Businesses today have to be more agile and have to be able to pivot—access to content needs to be very rapid,” says Lori Bradley, executive vice president for global talent management at […]

The education melting pot?

November 7th, 2017|Comments Off on The education melting pot?

While education is largely oriented toward teaching reading, writing, and arithmetic—and other academic subjects—we also hope that schools warm our melting pot by bringing together members of different racial and ethnic groups. Though having students of differing backgrounds attend school together does not guarantee an increase in inter-group harmony, having schools segregated by student background pretty much guarantees no increase in harmony. I’ve taken a look at who goes to school with whom at both the K-12 level and in four-year colleges. The results were not really what I was expecting—nor were they very encouraging.

I thought I would find that […]

A look at Pell Grant recipients’ graduation rates

November 7th, 2017|Comments Off on A look at Pell Grant recipients’ graduation rates

The federal government provides nearly $30 billion in grant aid each year to nearly 8 million students from lower-income families (mainly with household incomes below $50,000 per year) through the Pell Grant program, which can give students up to $5,920 per year to help pay for college. Yet in spite of research showing that the Pell Grant and similar need-based grant programs are effective in increasing college completion rates, there are still large gaps in graduation rates by family income. For example, among students who began college in the fall 2003 semester, Pell recipients were 7 […]

Register to attend “The past, present, and future of democratic education in America”

November 7th, 2017|Comments Off on Register to attend “The past, present, and future of democratic education in America”

The past, present, and future of democratic education in America

When: Thursday, November 16, 2017, 3:30 — 5:00 p.m.

Where: The Brookings Institution, Saul/Zilkha Room, 1775 Massachusetts Ave, NW, Washington, DC

What:

In the decades between the Revolution and the Civil War, Americans began to develop a robust school system. Yet back then, like today, disagreement was pervasive regarding the kind of education that was needed, who should pay for it, and how schools should be governed. In a recent book, “Democracy’s […]

What is the history of the minimum wage?

October 30th, 2017|Comments Off on What is the history of the minimum wage?

A minimum wage is the lowest wage that employers may legally pay to workers. The first minimum wage law was enacted in 1894 in New Zealand.

With the passage of The Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (FLSA), the U.S. minimum wage was initially set at $0.25 per hour for covered workers.  Since then, it has been raised 22 separate times–most recently, in July 2009, to $7.25 an hour.

FSLA provided a number of federal protections for the first time including

  • payment of the minimum wage
  • overtime pay for time worked over a set number of hours in a work week
  • […]