Workforce Resources 2016-11-27T09:08:23+00:00

WORKFORCE INNOVATION RESOURCES

6 points on race and culture from JD Vance and William Julius Wilson

September 26th, 2017|Comments Off on 6 points on race and culture from JD Vance and William Julius Wilson

America’s divisions – of race, class and culture – were the subject of an in-depth conversation here at Brookings between William Julius Wilson, Harvard professor, author of The Truly Disadvantaged and Brookings Non-Resident Senior Fellow; and J.D. Vance, author of Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis. It was a rich, timely and thought-provoking session, and you can watch the whole event here. A few points stood out to us, however, so we’ve pulled out a few clips.

1. jobs matter

Being in a job matters not just for income, but for a sense of purpose and […]

Rural dreams: Upward mobility in America’s countryside

September 26th, 2017|Comments Off on Rural dreams: Upward mobility in America’s countryside

One of the defining features of the “American Dream” is the ability to succeed despite being born to disadvantaged circumstances. However, growing up to be better off than one’s parents – upward absolute intergenerational mobility – appears to be a fading experience for many Americans in recent decades and one that varies widely across the country.

In “Rural dreams: Upward mobility in America’s countryside,” (PDF) Eleanor Krause and Richard Reeves build off an earlier examination of the rates of social mobility across the country by Raj Chetty and his colleagues.

While most of the research on geographical variations in […]

Race, poverty, and interpreting overrepresentation in special education

September 26th, 2017|Comments Off on Race, poverty, and interpreting overrepresentation in special education

New research by Morgan, Farkas, Hillemeier and Maczuga once again finds that when you take other student characteristics—notably family income and achievement—into account, racial and ethnic minority students are less likely to be identified for special education than white students.1 Though this finding is by now well established, it remains sufficiently controversial to generate substantial media buzz.2  And plenty of research—with less convincing methods—has been interpreted as showing that too many blacks, especially boys, are identified for special education.3 The old conventional wisdom may be intuitively appealing because aggregate disability rates—with no adjustments for family income or other student characteristics—are […]

High paying jobs alone won’t save big cities

September 26th, 2017|Comments Off on High paying jobs alone won’t save big cities

The specters of white worker angst and racial disparities that took center stage during the 2016 presidential election created conditions for a corporate hero to swoop in and make America great again.

Enter Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos stage left.

The tech mogul and newspaper owner has big-city mayors outstretching their arms for the possibility of accommodating and hosting Amazon’s “H2Q” headquarters. The company’s request for proposal (RFP) pronounced that HQ2 will hire 50,000 people for an industry that is positioned to propel cities towards the “next economy,” according to research by the Brookings Institution. The average annual salaries of […]

Summer learning loss: What is it, and what can we do about it?

September 26th, 2017|Comments Off on Summer learning loss: What is it, and what can we do about it?

As students return to school this fall, many of them – perhaps especially those from historically disadvantaged student groups – will be starting the academic year with achievement levels lower than where they were at the beginning of summer break. This phenomenon – sometimes referred to as summer learning loss, summer setback, or summer slide – has been of interest to education researchers going back as far as 1906.1 We review what is known about summer loss and offer suggestions for districts and states looking to combat the problem.

An early comprehensive review of the literature summarized several findings regarding […]

College rankings: How they actually work

September 21st, 2017|Comments Off on College rankings: How they actually work

College rankings are ubiquitous as the school year starts. U.S. News & World Report, Niche, and Times Higher Education all released rankings in September. 

The proliferation of these rankings have led some to revolt against the concept of neatly bucketing schools on lists where they are in the “top” or “bottom” of rankings, especially as top performers tend to be expensive private schools, and ballooning student debt calls into question college affordability.

Frank Bruni, a columnist at New York Times, wrote an especially damning a piece ridiculing college […]