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So far Dan DeMaioNewton has created 441 blog entries.

Don’t Miss National Apprenticeship Week: November 13-19, 2017

Mark your calendars! Next week— November 13 - 19, 2017—is the third annual National Apprenticeship Week (NAW). NAW is a nationwide opportunity for the workforce system and leaders in business, labor, education, and other critical partners to express their support for apprenticeship by showcasing their programs, facilities, and apprentices in their community. All week and across the country, there will be a series of industry-led events [...]

Don’t Miss National Apprenticeship Week: November 13-19, 2017 2017-11-09T11:00:29+00:00

As Corporate World Moves Toward Curated Microlearning, Higher Ed Must Adapt

Just outside the walls of the ivory tower, a transformation is underway in the world of corporate learning, and those of us at colleges and universities should pay attention. Corporate learning and development, often referred to as L&D, is radically different than just a few years ago. Meanwhile, the education dialogue has shifted to a focus on employment-related themes such as competencies and skills. “Businesses [...]

As Corporate World Moves Toward Curated Microlearning, Higher Ed Must Adapt 2017-11-07T17:08:03+00:00

The education melting pot?

While education is largely oriented toward teaching reading, writing, and arithmetic—and other academic subjects—we also hope that schools warm our melting pot by bringing together members of different racial and ethnic groups. Though having students of differing backgrounds attend school together does not guarantee an increase in inter-group harmony, having schools segregated by student background pretty much guarantees no increase in harmony. I’ve taken a [...]

The education melting pot? 2017-11-07T16:39:06+00:00

A look at Pell Grant recipients’ graduation rates

The federal government provides nearly $30 billion in grant aid each year to nearly 8 million students from lower-income families (mainly with household incomes below $50,000 per year) through the Pell Grant program, which can give students up to $5,920 per year to help pay for college. Yet in spite of research showing that the Pell Grant and similar need-based grant programs are effective in [...]

A look at Pell Grant recipients’ graduation rates 2017-11-07T13:44:03+00:00

Register to attend “The past, present, and future of democratic education in America”

The past, present, and future of democratic education in America When: Thursday, November 16, 2017, 3:30 — 5:00 p.m. Where: The Brookings Institution, Saul/Zilkha Room, 1775 Massachusetts Ave, NW, Washington, DC What: In the decades between the Revolution and the Civil War, Americans began to develop a robust school system. Yet back then, like today, disagreement was pervasive regarding the kind of education that was needed, who [...]

Register to attend “The past, present, and future of democratic education in America” 2017-11-07T12:38:16+00:00

What is the history of the minimum wage?

A minimum wage is the lowest wage that employers may legally pay to workers. The first minimum wage law was enacted in 1894 in New Zealand. With the passage of The Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (FLSA), the U.S. minimum wage was initially set at $0.25 per hour for covered workers.  Since then, it has been raised 22 separate times–most recently, in July 2009, [...]

What is the history of the minimum wage? 2017-11-03T11:48:05+00:00

Low-wage Work Uncertainty often Traps Low-wage Workers

Some policy analysts, policymakers and scholars argue that low-wage workers should “work their way out of poverty” by acquiring the human capital that would enable them to leave poverty-level jobs. A new study interviewing 25 low wage immigrant workers by Center for Poverty Research Affiliates Vicki Smith and Brian Halpin finds that while many of these low-wage workers recognize the need to enhance their skills [...]

Low-wage Work Uncertainty often Traps Low-wage Workers 2017-11-03T11:56:06+00:00

Benefits and best practices of safe city innovation

According to UNICEF, 70 percent of people around the world will live in cities by the year 2050. This trend toward urbanization will necessitate new operating models and pose challenges in terms of how to protect residents. Public safety, of course, is an important aspect of contemporary urban life. In a world that is chaotic, dangerous, and volatile, it is hard for there to be [...]

Benefits and best practices of safe city innovation 2017-10-26T13:37:26+00:00

Five maps show progress made, but mostly lost, on middle-class incomes in America

In September, the Census Bureau announced good news for the American middle class, courtesy of its Current Population Survey (CPS). Real median household income—that is, the income earned by a household squarely in the middle of the U.S. income distribution, adjusted for inflation—rose by 3.2 percent, the second consecutive year in which the measure increased. The trend likely reflected the effects of a tightening U.S. [...]

Five maps show progress made, but mostly lost, on middle-class incomes in America 2017-10-23T10:42:33+00:00

Devastation in Puerto Rico could produce a revolutionary power grid

Disasters often lead to unexpected and swift technology innovation. The calamitous collapse of Puerto Rico’s electricity system might be the next example of that phenomenon. As we know, Hurricane Maria devastated the island. Now, just a few weeks out, only about 15 percent of the island has electricity. Restoring its existing power grid of big diesel burning plants and long transmission lines to customers could [...]

Devastation in Puerto Rico could produce a revolutionary power grid 2017-10-23T14:48:25+00:00